Difference between revisions of "Full-side-facing"

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'''Full-Side-Facing''' positions are used to literally [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadside broadside] your opponents, allowing you to wale on them with full hip rotation and stance shifting, but without changing the facing direction. This is only useful to ensure incapacitation after establishing dominance, a situation which occurs in our [[Advanced|advanced]] [[Kata|kata]] and at the end of fights.  
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'''Full-side-facing''' positions are used to literally [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadside broadside] your opponents, allowing you to wale on them with full hip rotation and stance shifting, but without changing the facing direction. This is only useful to ensure incapacitation after establishing dominance, a situation which occurs in our [[Advanced|advanced]] [[Kata|kata]] and at the end of fights.  
  
 
To enter a full-side-facing, your feet must be two shoulder-widths apart, and lunging 90° away from your opponent. The bent knee carries 70% of your bodyweight. Your knees and toes point diagonally in the direction of your bent knee. Alternately, enter a [[Front stance|front stance]], and rotate your torso a 1/8th turn towards your trailing leg.   
 
To enter a full-side-facing, your feet must be two shoulder-widths apart, and lunging 90° away from your opponent. The bent knee carries 70% of your bodyweight. Your knees and toes point diagonally in the direction of your bent knee. Alternately, enter a [[Front stance|front stance]], and rotate your torso a 1/8th turn towards your trailing leg.   

Latest revision as of 21:02, 28 July 2020

Full-side-facing positions are used to literally broadside your opponents, allowing you to wale on them with full hip rotation and stance shifting, but without changing the facing direction. This is only useful to ensure incapacitation after establishing dominance, a situation which occurs in our advanced kata and at the end of fights.

To enter a full-side-facing, your feet must be two shoulder-widths apart, and lunging 90° away from your opponent. The bent knee carries 70% of your bodyweight. Your knees and toes point diagonally in the direction of your bent knee. Alternately, enter a front stance, and rotate your torso a 1/8th turn towards your trailing leg.

[Photos of full-side-facing from the front and side]

Everything in this world is a trade-off, and stancework is no different. Entering a full-side-facing augments power, but can hinder your mobility and stability. Full-side-facings should be used sparingly by advanced students or those with enough experience to make this sort of cost-benefit analysis in the heat of the moment.