Wrist releases

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Wrist grabs are one common form of assault, since bullies and abusers like to grab their victims before saying or doing something intimidating. This adds a physical connection to their hurtful words, making them to feel like bodily harm. Since you have the right to live a life a free of intimidation, we will provide you with the tools to do so.

The common mistake that students make with wrist releases is confusing the two methods. Remember, outside wrist releases begin and end by moving outside, and vice-versa. You must practice these until you can perform both without thinking about how to do them; this is the difference between understanding and knowing.

Inside wrist release

When an opponent grabs your wrist, quickly turn your hands up to look at your palms. (Pretend you are Oliver Twist, asking for more gruel.) The opponent will resist you, pulling your hands back down to reassert their dominance and control. Help the opponent, by circling your arms downward, and to the outside. When you have made a complete circle, your hands will be free -- it works just like magic.

[video of inside wrist release, looking down from overhead, if possible. Get the cameraman to stand on a ladder. ]

Indeed, it works exactly like magic, because it is just a trick. When you struggle against your opponent, you pit the strength of their arm against yours. Spinning in this way turns the table on your opponent -- now, it is the strength of your entire arm against just their thumb. Your arm is stronger than anyone’s thumb.

If your opponent has a particularly powerful grip, you may need to distract them, to get them to loosen up, using a front kick to the groin as an atemi. This technique will also off-balance the opponent, causing them to lean forward, which sets up a hip throw, body drop, or knee kick.

Outside wrist-release

When your opponent grabs your wrists, quickly turn your hands out away from you, as though you were showing off an engagement ring. The opponent, wanting to assert dominance and control, will try to pull your hands back in. Let them, and rotate your arms inward, towards your centerline. When your hands reach the top of the circle, and begin to move to the outside again, they will be free. (Alternately, just throw a ridgehand block.)

[video of outside wrist release, looking down from overhead, if possible. Get the cameraman to stand on a ladder. ]

Sometimes, even after doing everything correctly, the opponent may still hold your wrists at the end of this technique. However, they will have a poor grip, so you can launch your counterattack unimpeded. A poor grip is the same as no grip. Do not exaggerate this, by whipping your arms out to the side, and spectacularly flinging your opponent’s arms off of you; this will just leave you open to attack. Keep everything tight, with the arms in front of their shoulders, so you make a quick follow-up.

[video of outside wrist release, looking down from overhead, if possible. Get the cameraman to stand on a ladder. ]